Are you certain he is dead ?????????????

Ben

Moderator
Staff member
#1
When hunting hogs, it is a real good idea to know if they are DEAD before you get close to them. They can hurt you ! !

My cousin sent me these photos ( not of him ) , I thought that I'd pass them onto you.
Might save a lot of needle and thread for you hog hunters.





 
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Rick

Moderator
Staff member
#6
Bigger gun, bigger bullets, more powder. Sometimes it doesn't pay to skimp on stuff. :rolleyes:
A combination of adrenaline, fear and anger and a wild critter can be extremely dangerous. Of course it wouldn't hurt nearly as badly if ya waited a little while for porky to bleed out.
 

Brad

Administrator
Staff member
#8
Put an extra hole in them for certainty.
I once read that taxidermists work cheaper than surgeons.
 

KeithB

Resident Half Fast Machinist
#9
That old boy is going to need a lot of antibiotics for a while, the wounds can be stitched, the sepsis is what'll kill ya.
 

Eutectic

Active Member
#10
As well as enough gun...... Good 1st shot placement!

I shot one big boar while working in Texas. I had about given up when 260lbs of dynamite exploded right under my feet! It was thick brush the old boy headed for. I had a very quick shot at a south end heading north! The bullet hit his tailbone and went about 8" straight down the spine. The shot took out his rear legs......

That Piney Wood Rooter was MAD! He screeched the most hideous high pitch scream that ended in a rapid clacking of tusks that sounded like a machine gun burst! The hair on the back of my neck was standing straight out! I had roughly 12 feet before he would be into thick oak brush where NO ONE in their right mind would follow! I levered another round and hit a dead log he drug himself behind! Luckily he was slow dragging himself by his front legs never stopping the horrible serenade! I quickly sidestepped about 12 feet and and saw a clear front-end view some 6ft from no man's land........ I put one into his neck right at the Atlas Vertebrae and there was finally silence as he lay still. "WHEW!"

This bunch will like what I used. It was a Winchester Model 94 Trapper in .45 Colt. Sadly, it was a jacketed bullet! A 300gr Hornady XTP with a stout dose of 296 behind. It did the job but wish it had been cast Pete&Pig.jpg .....

Ranks with my two favorite hunts!

Pete
 
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Rick

Moderator
Staff member
#11
Shot this one in Oregon, 44m SBH, 300 gr RCBS, one shot in the rib cage just behind the shoulder. Got up running and took another shot in the neck. It went down into a dry creek under heavy brush and a third shot in the head before she gave up.

P5300195-1-9.jpg
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
#12
Yes, bring enough gun. I like my .458 Socom with ten 500-grain cast bullets on tap for poking around in the south Texas brush.

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Ian

Well-Known Member
#14
Levers are good if you are "in shape" with them. A Marlin GG would be my first choice for a levergun, hunting piggies in the brush. A .45 Colt like Pete used will get it done...but you never know what you'll stumble upon and Hogzilla you want something that will stop a bear at point-blank range.
 

Hawk

Well-Known Member
#15
On a pig, most of the vital organs are right between the shoulders and under the "shield".
Takes some horse power and a tough bullet to get through the thick shield or big shoulder bones of a big boar.
A mid body shot or shot behind the shoulders angling towards the rear will not bring them down as quickly as a deer or most other animals. These shots will let them run off and die in the brush.
We eat them, when they drop quick and are not too rank. I've actually had some big boars, 350 lb class, that were fine eating.
I've shot a few in the 225 to 275 lb. class with the .223 AR with the Barnes 62 gr. TTXS with carefully placed shots under 100 yards. Bullet seems to work well and I've never had one run over about 20 yards.
I want to shoot one with the 7.62WT, but haven't had the opportunity so far this year.
 

smokeywolf

Well-Known Member
#16
I've never hog hunted. Would like to, but not likely to spend any time in hog country and don't see myself spending money to hunt on a pay-to-hunt lease or ranch.
If the opportunity ever does arise, I think my first choice would be the 348 Winchester.

RE the guy's wounds, that would take a greater quantity of CELOX than I carry in any one of my med kits.
 
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Brad

Administrator
Staff member
#19
I shot a couple with a Marlin 1894 CB in 45 Colt. Load was a 265 WFN over a heap of H110, around 25 gr I think. At 25 yards it penetrated the head Of one hog and brained another thru the eye. Never saw the second much smaller pig. Got out of blind in time to see first hog get up and run. A couple quick follow up shots finished the action, one hit the lower hind leg and the second went into the chest from a rear raking angle.
Got back to the camp and someone asked if I was using an auto due to the rapid fire. Nope, just a well practiced guy with a levergun.
 
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Pistolero

Well-Known Member
#20
I killed two warthogs, which are a touch smaller than typical eating feral hogs here,
with a .44 Mag. One shot each, full pass through with 429421s over 20.0 2400
(you might have heard of that load before :)).

If I hunt pigs, it will be with the M94 Trapper in .44 Mag, or maybe with the 629.

Pretty nasty wounds.

Bill