Cleaning after shooting PC coated bullets

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
How do you guys feel about: " if you have to clean after shooting pc coated bulets"
When I shoot traditional lube bullets, depending on the rifle I may clean after 100 to 500 rounds down bore ( unless I get a load that leads)
The only thing I have seen in the bores after shooting PC coated bullets is a gray wash on the surface of the bore after pushing a tight dry patch through the bore ( to inspect for lead flakes...which most times means none!) I'm finding that even my first bullet out of a cold unclean bore shoots into the group!...
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
My goal is to NEVER clean a barrel. The only time I have to is when my experimenting causes a problem, or if I'm getting rid of copper, or of course after shooting black powder.
 

M3845708Bama

Active Member
I clean after 50 to 100 shots, I run a couple of jacketed bullets then use “BoreTech”to clean. No problems with this method. Jacketed bullets are usually more accurate than normal!
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
I think the Bore Tech cleaner is important to emphasize, from what you've written about trying various cleaners that PC fouling is hard to get out with anything else.
 

M3845708Bama

Active Member
I think the Bore Tech cleaner is important to emphasize, from what you've written about trying various cleaners that PC fouling is hard to get out with anything else.
I have not found any othe cleaner other than job that will really touch it
 

waco

Springfield, Oregon
Bama. BoreTech makes several products. Is there a certain one you recommend? I think I have the "Eliminator"
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
I amped up some Ed's Red with extra Acetone and it didn't faze the PC fouling I had from undersized bullets getting gas cut. 4-0 steel wool wrapped around a brush, soaked with acetone and ATF, is ultimately what took it out. From what I understand, acetone or MEK is a sort of standard used to test the cure of PC, if it softens it it isn't cured well enough.
 

Winelover

North Central Arkansas
:headscratch:So what's the advantage of PC-ing? If I'm reading this right............choice is either, possible leading or PC fouling removal. Both a PITA to remove. Was thinking of possibly going this route with the one and only troublesome firearm that I get minimal leading with.

I just cracked open a bottle of BT Eliminator. Instructions say use only with a nylon brush.....I'm guessing because it will eventually dissolve the bronze bristle ones. But so will other brands of solvents that work at removing lead and copper fouling. I always rinse my bronze brushes, after each use in an automotive wax / metal degreaser. Anyone using bronze brushes with BT Eliminator?
 

M3845708Bama

Active Member
Unless I have a bore tech nylon, I use bronze and just wipe off good after use, usually finish with couple swipes of ATF. Have not lost a brush yet.
 

Winelover

North Central Arkansas
I have had bronze bristles, literally fall off, when I failed to rinse the brush after just using it dry brushing for leading inspection.
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
Just want to clarify my original post here: I'm not having any PC fouling problems…Yes I have notice a gray tint in the bore at the muzzle after about 100 rounds but it is no more exciting then normal antimony wash which totally I ignore, shooting lubled bullets until I get to around 500 rounds some time more.

By no means can I call my bore PC fouled! Just was wondering what other folks do. One of my rifles hasn't been cleaned from PC shooting in the past 300 rounds& & is still shooting accurately So I agree with Ian's posting in #3 I was just wondering if other folks were having as good lasting conditioned bores and for how long.
 

GRMPS

Active Member
Many people don't read the directions completely on powder coating. It call for baking the bullet/item for "X" amount on time AFTER the PC has started to melt/flow meaning the bullet/substrate has reached the desired temperature. "X" amount of time is required for a complete cure.
oh, -- don't shoot undersized lead bullets :eek:
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
Yep, bake time starts once the part has reached cure temperature. Might take a while, especially if you don't have a convection oven. My 400°F cure paint starts to flow at about 280°F PMT, or about 3-4 minutes in the oven with .30-caliber bullets. Just because it's flowing doesn't mean you start the clock on the cure time. This is one thing where most people seem to do a lot of guessing.
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
I guess what I was asking in my OP was When I shot Trad lube I didn't clean my rifles until 500 -600 rounds unless leading was present ( usually not with my loads) ...The question was how long can you go with "good PC'd" loads before cleaning?