CZ75B

John

Active Member
I shoot a Smith and Walther 999 I got as a police trade in and a Kahr CM in 40. They are a joy to load for with power pistol.. The Kahr does it's best with the Lee 145 and .400", the S&W .401 and the Lee 175 standard groove. The Kahr fits in my palm and is as easy to shoot as a 9.
 

CZ93X62

Redlands, Kalifornistan
On the CZ-75.......Browning Hi-Power holsters fit it perfectly. Anyone familiar with the BHP will be very comfortable with the CZ-75B.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Yes, agreed - BUT--
Except that the internal small parts count and disassembly past pulling the slide and barrel for the
CZ-75 is way, way worse than the BHP. BHP is ultra simple, the CZ-75 is ultra complex. I did a trigger job
for a friend on a CZ 75, what a PITA design internally! I like the gun, I like the ergonomics, I shoot it well, and
have a .22 cal version, too. But I am no fan of the internals. Seems like using 5 parts when two would
do. The BHP is even simpler than the 1911 internally. JMB had to avoid violating his own patents which
were owned by Colt at that time, so had to do it entirely differently, and boy did he.

a shame the BHP is nearly gone. I have a Hungarian FEG that I will be milling the slide for a set
of Novak sights here soon. Should really fix it up. Then a rust blue refinish and new grips and it
will be pretty much reborn. FEG quality is pretty decent from what I can tell.

Bill
 
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Brad

Administrator
Staff member
I did a complete tear down on my CZ 75B once. Won’t ever do that again. It does have a heap of little parts and tiny springs.
From now on that action gets sprays with cleaner, dried, and recoiled every so often.
That said it fits my hand better than any other handgun and I wouldn’t be without it.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Brad, have you shot a BHP? IMO, they are equal and outstanding grip designs.
I understand that there is the Omega version of the CZ which I handled at LGS, and trigger is similar in single action, reportedly much simpler inside, but never had one apart to see. Simpler would be in the right direction.
Cannot overstate how simple the BHP is internally.

Bill
 
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Brad

Administrator
Staff member
If I could fine a BHP at the right price I would buy one. Well, if my “accountant” approved....

Never fired one but have never heard anything but positive.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
They are good pistols. Did you shot my HP when you were here? I think I may have brought
it to the range, but maybe not.

Bill
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Works for me. I have three. :)

Israeli surplus MKIII is rough but has good safety, ambi, and nice dovetailed sights.
The FEG will have Novak sights soonish, originals are poor, as was typical of the era
and the Browning commercial had a better safety and great sights added by Bill Laughridge,
and Metalloy, plus nicer grips added by me. Technically, that one is my wife's gun but
she is generous about letting me borrow it.

So far I have never had ANY BHP jam, ever. Including my first pistol reloading and
casting adventures, which is pretty amazing, I must have made some mistakes, I was
a beginner, yet it digested 100% of them.

Bill
 
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popper

Well-Known Member
Went to LGS to pick up a H2 buffer, asked the guy about CZ as I'd never seen one before. Showed me a 308 rifle and a 75. Boy that thing is heavy. Looks fancy too.
 

Hawk

Well-Known Member
I've loaded cast bullets for the 40 Smith & Wesson since the mid 90s and never had the slightest problem. I'm now powder coating and loading 5.5 or 5.7 grains of unique for several Glocks and a Beretta model 96. Never had any problems, failure to feeds or any other issues. Always reliable, and more accurate then I am.
 

Hawk

Well-Known Member
Should have qualified that those loads are with 165 to 170 grain bullets. 170 grain solids and 165 grain hollow points.
 

popper

Well-Known Member
It said 75 on the slide. The 308 looked like most wood & steel 308s in the economical range. I'm not fond of bolt rifles, mostly from a POS single shot (old) 22 short with the cocking knob on the back. Dang thing would fire if the notch didn't catch right. Hack sawed the barrel and inlaid one side of the stock with an exacto. Shot it in the attic at a wood crate full of 2x4s, never was accurate. Never did the other side and don't know what happened to it - Mom probably threw it out when I left home, along with some carbs, cams and my baseball card collection.
Dad did get mad at me when I tried pulling bullets from live 50cal. he kept after B29 gun control tests. Actually I couldn't get them out with vice and pliers so I resorted to an elec. drill when he caught me. Dumb kid.
 

fiver

Well-Known Member
definitely the rifle, I looked at a 6.5X55 a few years back and it outweighed my AR-30.
the 75 isn't too bad at all for a larger gun.
 

CZ93X62

Redlands, Kalifornistan
I like the heft of my CZ-75B. That happens when you make things out of ordnance steel rather than recycled beer cans or PVC sprinkler conduit. In fairness, I own Glocks and SIG-Sauers, which feature those latter attributes. They haven't broken (yet). So, I dunno. I try to appreciate them all for their respective merits and faux pas.

My CZ-550 Lux doesn't seem "heavy" to me either. Of course, its 9.3mm bore has a lot more metal drilled out than does a 6.5mm bore, though its 23.6"/600mm barrel makes up some of that loss from the usual 22" sporter tubes. 286 grain NosParts departing at 2400 FPS do make you crave a bit more weight at the range. Fired at a live target, I don't notice recoil. Funny how that works.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
Al,
Any experience with the M&P40 from S&W? That platform seems to be by far more
user friendly to me than the Glock platform, better trigger out of the box, and with
an Apex sear, even better. AIM has them at bargain prices, LEO trade-in for $240.

I have avoided the .40S&W for decades, this might be cheap enough to give it a try.
I have a M&P45, which so far has been a pretty good gun, but not a huge round count
thru it yet.

Bill
 
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CZ93X62

Redlands, Kalifornistan
No hands-on with the S&W M&P-series autopistols at all. Guys and gals I know and whose experiences & opinions I respect speak pretty highly of them. I need another autopistol system in my safe like a trout needs a mountain bike, but hobbyist curiosity might prompt a purchase one of these days. Their Sigma-style articulated trigger is off-putting as h--l to me, after the rotten-poor performances of Sigma pistols we saw at work on the range late in my career. Very bad ju-ju in the presence and context of Glock and SIG-Sauer models that run well and don't break. This put The Stink on S&W autopistols among cops and rangemasters that persists to this day, much like the general disgust with the Hillary Hole found on S&W revolvers. Makes ya wonder if S&W is being run by organized-crime types perping a bust-out scam on the company.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
My M&P45 has a thumb safety, and the flexible bottom portion of the trigger is entirely unnoticable to
me. Lower bore center than the SIGs by quite a bit. I have a SIG 225/P6 single stack 9mm, and it is a good
gun, no doubt, but no fan of the dbl/single system, even though I trained up on it for SIG 225 and Beretta 92
to do some training with the B92, and I have carried the SIG when traveling by air because it has no emotional
attachment, can be easily replaced with an identical unit for just some $$ if some airline baggage handler
stole it.
I certainly passed "Need" about 15 exits back, so this would be an interesting study more than anything, although
I do agree that the 40 is likely to be more effective in actual social situations than the 9mm. I never shot, just barely
even handled a Sigma, they were out and then gone so quickly, it seemed. I never even heard much about them except
the lawsuit situation.

Bill
 
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