Hog Bullet

Creeker

Active Member
We all know that wild hogs can be tough at times to put down. Here is a bullet taken from a hog. A customer sent this picture from one of his hunts. That bullet was hard, cast from 92-6-2, 18 BHN.hogbullet1.jpg
 
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Eutectic

Active Member
A big boar hog can be a dangerous customer...... Too hard of bullet can 'act' like a full metal jacket with lots of penetration with a heavy payment of a lot less 'shock'.....
On dangerous stuff you can't use an explosive bullet with minimal penetration. But bullet frontal area is 'king' for a quick dispatch. Some mushrooming with holding together and going deep is your goal.

While the picture attached is a jacketed slug (Hornady .45 300gr XTP) it displays what I want for deep penetration along with taking the fight out of
what could be a dangerous situation. This was from a .45 Colt rifle at 1600fps. The 260 lb boar was a mean one but the equipment was meaner yet!
This "XTP" was from a lot when first introduced..... Don't expect this performance from current production which mushroom quicker.
Pete


BoarHorror.jpg
 

popper

Well-Known Member
I'm planning on this one, hope to get 1600 fps. 175gr PB - BO pistol. Did get a hit on a runner last year with it, blood but no pig.
 

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Brad

Administrator
Staff member
This is a place where a heat treated WW bullet can do really well. Hardness from heat treat lets us drive it hard but being lower in Sb it stays together on impact.
My 2 pigs were shot with a WW type alloy water dropped. Bullet was a 452 260 WFNGC in my Marlin 1894CB in 45 Colt. Don't recall the exact load but it was a heap of H110.
One shot, 2 pigs. Clean pass thru with first shot on large hog, little one behind that I didn't even see got brained and went right down. First one got back up and ran. Second shot was low and back, just in front of hind legs. Third shot was on should and pig was down for the count. Got back to camp and a couple guys asked if someone was using an autoloader. No, just a smooth levergun and a guy who runs it well. With a red dot sight it isn't any different from a shotgun really.
 

Creeker

Active Member
Like the story Brad. I've cast & sold a bunch of bullets from 92-6-2. I've found this alloy doesn't shatter when air cooled. I've not tried it water cooled on hard targets. If memory serves COWW are 4.5 or 5% Sb. Is that correct?
 

Brad

Administrator
Staff member
I think they are closer to 2.5% Sb.
Most of my shooting range scrap either plain or with a little monotype added. I like something around 2%Sb and maybe .5% Sn heat treated. I can get 18 BHn easily and know they will hold together very well.
 

fiver

Well-Known Member
they used to be about 4%, [70's time frame]
waay back when,[30's-40's] they were reported to be more like 7% that seems a bit high to me but that's the story.
I know many of the bigger truck weights from the 70's time frame had a good bit of antimony in them [5-6%] those I measured myself.
 

Rick

Moderator
Staff member
I'm thinking my old Lyman manual said 95-4.5-.5 but I'd have to look to be sure.
That was true back in the 70's & earlier as was said. By the 80's it had been reduced significantly. A few years back over the on the other site people from all over the country mailed CWW bullet samples to two different XrF tests in two different states. That the results came back as right at 2% didn't surprise me but that the results for WW came back as consistent as they did from both testing sites amazed me. I've just considered them since as 2%. Lyman hasn't updated a lot of the info in subsequent books, just keep reprinting, errors and all.
 

358156 hp

Well-Known Member
Lynn. With that kind of performance lengthways through a hog, I can see how Dry Creek got its reputation for quality. The legend says 250KT, is that the RCBS bullet? I sold my 44 stuff off ages ago, but ended up with another Redhawk about a year ago. I thought my MP HG503 mould would do what I wanted, but we're not getting along well, and I'm ready to buy another 82080 to serve an my "utility" bullet.
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
454424 50/50 WW/20-1+copper comes out 94-2.5-3.2-.25 ish . 17yd @1000 fps . 24" through , hit a heavy rib going in near the spine exit near the elbow through the shoulder meats 3/4" hole in the shield grissel .
Same load 47 yd 12" through half inch exit through the shield .
Same load very much inside powder burn range , 36" through , just inside the right front shoulder , 2 ribs , half moon trough through the left ham inside the hide hole was about a half inch .
None recovered .

I liked the results with the original round lube groove Lyman single I bought a NOE 5c knock off . It shoots about the same , close enough for me anyway . It had to be kept sub sonic in the 1-32 twist of the carbine as when it hit the line coming down it would change direction about 40° up and right on a 60ft radius . I've been told that's not tumbling and has nothing to do with transonic speeds , wide nose , and slow twist ..... But whatever .......
 

Creeker

Active Member
Lynn. With that kind of performance lengthways through a hog, I can see how Dry Creek got its reputation for quality. The legend says 250KT, is that the RCBS bullet? I sold my 44 stuff off ages ago, but ended up with another Redhawk about a year ago. I thought my MP HG503 mould would do what I wanted, but we're not getting along well, and I'm ready to buy another 82080 to serve an my "utility" bullet.
The bullet above, I can't remember the entire story & have misplaced it. The bullet is the RCBS 44-250-K. I've shot this bullet some but found the Lyman 429421 cast from the two 4 cavity moulds I used operating Dry Creek to be more accurate but keep in mine I've only owned a couple of 44s so don't take that as a blanket statement. The HG 503 I've not shot enough to make any kind of statement. Not much help here.
 

fiver

Well-Known Member
you have to remember the 454424 has a shorter and wider nose compared to the 44 Keith types.
you'd have to shoot a cement wall to make that nose flatten back any.