PC shaking method

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California's Central Coast Amid The Insanity
I'd been starting to think about the maybes of contemplating the possibilities of ever getting involved with painting my bullets till I read Fiver's last sentence.
 

fiver

Well-Known Member
it has it's uses.
I'd do more [shrug] but it is nice to have the option in your pocket if you need it.
I think it's a handy skill to have even if you don't use it on everything.
 

Spindrift

Active Member
Brad, I just coated a handful of bullets using your «vigorious-up-and-down» technique, as opposed to the more orbital horisontal movements I have used till now. Huge difference! This seems to greatly improve the efficiancy and quality of my coating technique, thank you for sharing!
 

popper

Well-Known Member
I've begun using the swirl without any just to get the static up then add and do a shake & toss method. Seems to work better. Supposed to rain all this week in addition to the 5" from last week. No coating.
 
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Brad

Administrator
Staff member
I did a second coat on some to see how much difference I could find in shooting.
Loaded the single coat bullets first for 357 mag. If those don’t lead then I am good to go.

Still learning with all this stuff
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
So sticking with the lightweight vamint weights there, Intel6.;):oops:

That last one on the right is HUGE, and the others are no slouches, either.

I think I will not go above my .480 Ruger.

Bill
 

Intel6

Member
Yeah, because this is a .50 cal they are my heaviest. I go up to 600 gr. in .458" but the monster on the right beats them all.

I should have specified what they are in the pic so L to R:

Lee 440 gr. That comes out to exactly 450 for me when coated and gas checked. The first one on the L is my lower velocity plinking load since the bullet is seated to the upper crimp groove.

Same bullet in my heavy load for that bullet signified by being seated out to the lower crimp groove.

Next is a NOE mould that makes a 700 gr. solid but it is the hollow pointed version with an extra long/fat HP pin that makes the big cavity go down past the half way mark of the bullet and makes it a 570 gr. with softer alloy. the HP cavity goes down below the crimp groove, I call it the big mouth HP.

The last one on the right is the full 700 gr. solid.

And finally for Bill, a pic of some lightweight cast bullets(culls used for examples) L to R:

NOE copy of the RCBS 55 gr. .22 cal

NOE 45 gr. WFN I use for plinking in the hornet, I also have a GC version.

NOE 37 gr. I use in my magazine fed Anschutz hornets



22 cal bullets.jpg
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
700 grains from a handgun, huh? Holy moley. 500 grains from the shoulder of my suppressed .458 at 1K fps is plenty enough for me.
 

Intel6

Member
700 grains from a handgun, huh? Holy moley. 500 grains from the shoulder of my suppressed .458 at 1K fps is plenty enough for me.
I mainly shoot them out of my T/C Encore with the 20" Katahdin barrel.

Encore Katahdin 500 S&W.jpg

500 grs in a .458 SOCOM? How about 600 grs. ?

NOE 600_570 gr. .458 web.jpg
 

wquiles

Active Member
Brad, I just coated a handful of bullets using your «vigorious-up-and-down» technique, as opposed to the more orbital horisontal movements I have used till now. Huge difference! This seems to greatly improve the efficiancy and quality of my coating technique, thank you for sharing!
Nice. I will definitely try this alternate shaking method on my next batch!

Thanks Brad for sharing :)
 

Spindrift

Active Member
Found a product in the hardware store that I have found convenient. It is a teflon covered mesh, intended for putting on the grill to make a non-stick surface for your burgers. When I pick up my freshly powderd bullets, I just lay them down sideways. When I have tried this with wax paper, it generates defects in the coat. With the mesh, I get no defects- other than the ones I have got already, due to imperfect technique. This makes it less of a pain to coat long, skinny 05B382CC-6C6D-46C6-8905-B10C9FC86C6B.jpegbullets.

I am impressed how nice and even coats you guys get. Mine look a bit more ragged (at least so far, still new to this process). But they seem to work OK.