Sav 99

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
Rummaging through my belongings in the attic the other day and I reach into a box to see if I can feel whatever it is I was originally looking for. I feels a hunka steel under the magazines and old boots. I can't imigine what it is, so I pulls up and what to my wondering eyes should appear but a Savage 99 stripped action! Far as I can tell it was a case of immaculate conception by a cardboard box and some LL Bean Maine Guide boots as I have no idea where this came from. Serial number in the 21K range and not in terrible shape. I have a complete, slightly newer 99, ser #54K, that's boogered up bad. My diabolical mind is already seeing a 25/35 walking varmint rifle, maybe even a 25/35 Ackley! Not sure on that 'cuz the spool mag is finicky on case shape. Of course all that would require me actually finding time and the energy to build this sucker up. Still, finding something like that is lots better than catching a sharp stick in the eye!
 

oscarflytyer

Well-Known Member
Bret... depending on what it is, pls let me know. I know where there is a, I THINK, 99 308 pieces and parts....
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
Early SN had square threads and receivers too short and weak for the .308. All I got is a rotted-out 30-30 barrel with a bar welded to it really well in front of the chamber. Bret, if you get around to it one day I got the code cracked on the threads.
 

RicinYakima

High Steppes of Eastern Washington
The NRA Gunsmithing book has the threads specs. Cutting square threads is not a big deal.
 

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
It will be a miracle if I ever actually get around to it, but it would be fun. This is the old square bolt design. Thanks for the offers and info!
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
Cutting square threads is not a big deal.
No, it isn't, but since the barrel being centered in the receiver hole depends only on closeness of fit, you have to get the major/minor very close to each other, much closer than class B 60° thread tolerance of the same size. The other trick is the threads have no relief on the barrel tenon, so the cutter literally has to be stopped in the cut just before the shoulder. The only way I could do that and not crash was by turning the chuck by hand.
 

RicinYakima

High Steppes of Eastern Washington
No, it isn't, but since the barrel being centered in the receiver hole depends only on closeness of fit, you have to get the major/minor very close to each other, much closer than class B 60° thread tolerance of the same size. The other trick is the threads have no relief on the barrel tenon, so the cutter literally has to be stopped in the cut just before the shoulder. The only way I could do that and not crash was by turning the chuck by hand.
You have that right, Ian. The set up is a little more involved. I have only done this for 1903 Springfield barrels and they have a half thread relief in the action and on the barrel, next to the shoulder. Turned the chuck by hand and finished with a file I ground to three sides safe and the tenth inch thread size.

Pre-WWII Springfield barrel shank specs were very tight and you can run into problems trying to screw Remington, Smith-Corona or High Standard barrels into the 1903 action.

It is (was) a problem with a third model Savage 99 take-down I have. Every time you took it down, the zero changed. Finially I just 'glassed the barrel into the receiver and it has stayed ever since. :rofl:
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
A Novice here when it comes to machining: I find this thread fascinating when it comes to the different style threads! I'm enjoying it and trying to understand
 

Rally

NC Minnesota
I had a similar experience about a month ago Bret. Was cleaning off the top of my gun cabinet and found a barrel for a Savage 99 in 22 hi power. It belongs to a friend of mine that moved to Ne. With his job. Asked if he wanted it back a couple years ago when he stopped by, but he said he knew where it was at.
 

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
I have seen more than one guy solve the problem of running threads up to a tight stop solve the problem by mounting the tool upside down and running the operation in reverse. Never even came close to trying that myself, but it's an option.

Rally, That stinking .004 of extra room in a 22 Hi Power barrel is always the stumbling block for me. The 219 Zipper is a better answer, but that spool mag might not work with such a different case. Funny how stuff gets "lost" and discovered later. I hope someday to find out where I left/lost my felling lever, both my 1/2" hammer drills, several chains and my hair...
 

Rally

NC Minnesota
I don’t care much for or know much about the mod99 Bret. He and his family have been good friends for years, and he has stored several firearms with me over the years. He is a crane operator and travels to storm damage areas rebuilding power lines . He’s had women problems in the past, so my place is a refuge for stuff he really doesn’t want to go missing.
 

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
The Hi Power uses a .228 bullet instead of a .224. Makes life difficult for those wanting to make use of it. It's not a bad old cartridge for stuff up to coyote size, or eve deer with the right bullet and placement. But .228 bullets are few and far between.

I've known a few guys that sound like your bud. Got one now not far from me that has his stuff scattered all over the North Country trying to keep wife #2 or 3 from getting it all.