so waht ya doin today?

462

California's Central Coast Amid The Insanity
I imagine that replacing a lightweight four-banger with a much heavier a V-8 would create a lot of understeer.

A local geezer can often be seen driving his all original Tiger. Original with the exception of the spiffy Minilites.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
1963 Corvette weighed 3150, the fuel inj engine rated at 360 hp. The Dodge Dart for 63 weighed
2640 with the small engine, and I am sure more like 2900-3000 with the bigger 413. The Ram Induction
413 was rated in 1963 at 410 hp with the 11:1 compression. Perhaps 50 hp more and 150 -250 lbs
less, does seem to favor the Dart, unless it was a heavier body. Some question whether the song
says "Super stock Dodge..." or "Super stock Dart winding out in low.."

Road and Track, in 1963 reported 14.9 1/4 mile times with the Vette, and one online report said the
413 Darts for 1962 were "turning mid 14s in the quarter mile". So say . 14.5 or 14.6 maybe. Pretty
close numbers.

So, depending on how the car hooked up (in the song, the Vette had slicks, maybe a decisive
adavantage) and driver skill, it could probably go either way, but the 413 probably had a small
advantage. Perhaps the IRS on the Vette put the power down better. I drove E-jags in that era and
with that great IRS and limited slip, even with lots of torque, light car and skinny tires it was very difficult
to spin the tires, it just hooked up magnificently, a squeak and GO! Never drove a Vette of that era, no idea
if their IRS was anywhere near as good in laying down traction as the E Jag. I know that solid axles with leaf
springs generally were NOT good at that without traction bars and other help.

Bill
 
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Pistolero

Well-Known Member
A friend had the Sunbeam Alpine (same car as the Tiger, but ~90 hp 4 cyl) and it was a nice
car. With a 260 Ford.....should have been really fast. Not sure about handling though. Brit
4cyls were typically inordinately heavy, and the 260/289 was not so bad, so may not have
been as bad as you might think. The AC Ace became the Cobra 289 with the same basic
swap. Shelby did the Tiger swap, too, and pushed the 260 V8 farther back and got the wt
distribution to about 50/50 and the claims of the time are the handlind did not suffer
significantly. But never had the honor of driving a Tiger. I was THAT close to driving
an original 289 Cobra, but when we fired it up all four accelerator pumps were leaking
fuel and that was the end of that. It was far away and the owner died a couple years later,
and that was the end of that. Darn it!
I recently drove a Miata with a 430 HP Corvette engine, Camaro 5 speed and Caddy IRS and
diff and LTD slip. (Flyin Miatia) THAT was an amazing car, still well balanced but REALLY fast. I can
imagine what a well done Alpine conversion (Tiger) was like. Of course, not 430 hp or anywhere
near.

Bill
 
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Intheshop

Well-Known Member
Me and shopdog are on our own for a few days. Wifey is taking the oldest Gdaughter to visit her(wife's) sister in Florida. I was gonna go but then the subject of Disneyworld came up and....nyet,I ain't doing it.

We have been parked under a rain cloud now for 3 days. Heck,had tornado threats last night but,like they did last year...... half went W of us,others went E.... traveling N,by NE "up" the Blue Ridge. We're in a pocket.

I like wandering around with gun&dog in rain,but draw the line at high winds. Got plenty of projects in the shop to keep us busy.
 

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
Bret,speaking of pine and fine furniture.....

Late 18th century, eastern shore Va,and N.E. coastal N.C saw a reasonably well represented amount of pine raised panel pieces being produced. I'd say it lasted until probably 1820,starting around 1750 or so.

Clear pine, or at least select though, right? Not knotty pine I don't imagine. In some on my older books, Eric Sloane perhaps, there is reference to artists useing clear pine planks as a canvas at one time.
 

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
I had an Alpine. Paid $100.00 for it. Wonderful little car! My example was ugly as sin but you could push start it easily, which was good because it would never hold a charge. Great handling little ride compared to anything else I'd driven. Sold it for $100.00 after it died on me on the Va/NC line and I walked 23 miles on a Saturday night. Then I got picked up by a crazy bus driver who forced the first car he saw with a Cherry Point bumper sticker off to a stop. He pretty much threw me out of his truck and left me there with my bag and a po'd officer type who calmed down enough to give me a ride. Towed the Sunbeam back and sold it that evening. Wish I'd kept it.

Rained real hard here over night. First time in 20 some years the rain on the roof has been loud enough for me to notice it. Deary day today.
 
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L Ross

Active Member
22 degrees this morning in South West WI. Lots of surprise lilies got a surprise this morning, along with some daffodils. The Trilliums being a wild flower may tolerate such abuse better. At least it is clear and calm out. When it warms up a bit I have some load testing to do. I've started messing with a .308 Remington 700 Varmint. Took off the abominable plastic ventilated stock and have two other options now. A walnut police take off and a 40-X stock that has been glassed and pillared. It has a wonderful after market trigger I don't know much about but is delightful to use. I had it in the police stock last night and was dry firing off hand at deer in the drive way. Every rifle should have a trigger like that! I stuck an old long tube El Paso K-8 adjustable objective with fine cross wires on it and I have about 10 different 30 caliber cast candidates to try in it.
 

L Ross

Active Member
I'll try to resize a photo of the Rod. Okay, so why doesn't it show up like those beautiful full size photos of the garage and revolver?
 
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462

California's Central Coast Amid The Insanity
Bill,
The reason those Brit sports car engines were overly heavy was due to their ancient design. The 948 cc, 1098 cc, and 1275 cc, that MG Midgets and Austin Healey Sprites used were of 1930s design and over 40-years old by the time federal safety regulations killed off so many imports. Early Triumphs used tractor engines. I don't know the origin of the engine used in the Healey 100-4, but reckon it was of '30s vintage too, and the 3000 was just two cylinders longer.
 

JonB

Central Minnesota
Engine designs.

I had a Motoguzzi back in the 1990s, A 1971 750cc Ambassador. It drove like a tractor compared to the other bikes (Japanese made) that I've owned. At some point, I read an article about Motoguzzi, and I guess they used (or reused) a engine design from a tiny light duty 3 wheeled truck they sold to the military for border patrol duty.
 

popper

Well-Known Member
The Healy motor was designed as a water pump for Q Mary. Trans was a 4 speed tractor with elec overdrive added. End plates were 1/2" steel that would have been welded to the deck but were cut off for the car. Brakes were Guerlings but the frame was twisty. Almost bought an AC while in HS, pretty little car but no guts. Heavy 4 banger - try the Model A ford. Pulled the body and frame off the engine cause we didn't have anything to hook the chain hoist to that would hold it. I could just barely get the flywheel vertical on the ground. Channeled that 4 door 12" and had a guy weld spokes on the reversed Merc rims for strength. HS buddy bought the cars I found that were neat, he went on to work for Roush. Passed a few years back.
 
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Intheshop

Well-Known Member
I shoot the one in the 12 zone...

Oldest,and youngest.... me and shopdog blasting 3D Saturday morning. We had a picnic lunch with family,following at a bow,proshop.... I had fun.20190413_124620_resized_1.jpg
 

Roger Allen

Active Member
I got a new rcbs number 1. Cleaning it up and putting it together. I like this new one so much I’m debating on selling my other rcbs number 1.

Loaded a bunch of test loads w some aa7 I got for 55 dollars a 8 lb keg. 357 mag, armscor brass, unix primers, 11.0/11.5/12.0 gr w a 140 gr mp solid bullet powder coated yellow
 

CZ93X62

Redlands, Kalifornistan
The British STILL hadn't evolved their engine technology much by c. 1971. I had a Ford Pinto from that year with the 1600 cc push-rod 4-banger. There was A LOT of iron in that block and its cylinder head. I rebuilt the engine in 1979, and kept it OEM-rated. One of my better rebuilds, it was still running well almost 10 years later per the buyer. His kids loved driving it. Not many early-70s Pintos survived into the late 1980s.