Some old Photos for your enjoyment

Bret4207

St Lawrence river valley, NY
#44
There are several movies/videos of major blizzards in the 40's/50's and the massive effort to get folks dug out and save livestock. Allis Chalmers had a professionally done film featuring, of course, AC equipment doing the work. It's on You Tube. Great flick.
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
#45
December 1937. "Deer hunter. Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania." Medium format acetate negative by Arthur Rothstein
1937 Deer Hunter.jpg

California circa 1920. "Briscoe auto at campsite."
California circa 1920. %22Briscoe auto at campsite.%22 .jpg
Via Shorpy.com
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
#47
Looks like a Rem Model 14 in the pic with the 1937 license plate. Unknown to me pump
.22 and semiauto shotgun in the lower pic. I'd have to bet on an Auto 5 given that date,
not sure there were any other auto shotguns in circulation then, guessing early 20s, maybe.

Pretty neat tent/bed rig, too. Four people, room for max two to sleep inside. Maybe the
ladies got the tent, the guys in bedrolls.

Bill
 
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RBHarter

West Central AR
#48
Quick search found this .
http://www.remingtonsociety.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=17069
I thought the Model 11 Remington was that old . I don't remember the exact details but it seems like FN made some A5s then Remington was licensed to build them as model M11 then after about 10 yr FN resumed production of the A5 . It could be either one . The more refined bead suggests Browning over the Rem . The Rem has a blocky almost like a slug barrel sight . I think the rifle with it is a Remington pump 22 . It has an almost tear drop shaped ejection port . At that time it would have been a brand new gun .
 

CZ93X62

Redlands, Kalifornistan
#49
I don't have a pic to post up, but I have seen photos of the California Zephyr passenger train buried in snow somewhere in Donner Pass c. 1954.
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
#50
UP Here in NEPA We had something called the "Billy Sunday" snow storm ( I think it was in 1933) I have a neat image of that with a train at my studio in the archives ( I will dig out)
On another vane: Here is what the closest big town to me looked like in 1900 Ah Just breathe it all in!
You can blow this one up for detail

Scranton, Pennsylvania, circa 1900. "Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western Railroad yards." Panorama of two 8x10 inch glass negatives.
Scranton_RR_Panorama.jpg
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
#51
OK, I HAVE a Model 11 Rem, and did not know how early they were in production. I had heard that
Browning had Remington make Auto 5s during WW2 and mark them Browning, and that Browning
had gone back to FN after the war.....and thought that THAT was the beginning of the Model 11, in WW2.

I just checked and no, the M-11 was first made in 1905, so was certainly around when that pic was
taken. As a matter of fact, I just checked an online source and apparently MY M-11 was made in
1924, so it could have been in the pic, at least theoretically. Mine has a Cutts Compensatore, but
it could have been added later.

If we could see the pistol grip, early Auto 5s had the spherical bottom on the pistol
grip, and my M-11 has a flat bottomed one. So, it could be either an Auto 5 or a Rem Model 11.
But maybe the front sight gives it away, like RBHarter says. Mine isn't original, so I don't know.
No kind of expert on Auto 5s, that is for sure. The old Rem is around just because it was a nice
old shotgun for an amazingly low price. Shoots great, and I made a new choke tube for the
Cutts to put a 12" pattern of #1 B at 20 yds, in case some critters cause trouble in the yard.

We have rail yards larger than that one in the pic above in KC area today. But certainly not the
steam rising from the locomotives! And the buildings are a bit newer, but some, not much.

Bill
 
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RBHarter

West Central AR
#52
I'm not a Browning authority either but the A5 was on my list of lust for a long time . Big picture ....... All the flavor and color without getting to tangled up and bogged down in the minutia details . Sometimes I misplaced things .
I ended up with a 1974 Mag but I glanced over dozens of model 11s and read enough to know that a M11 wouldn't do to satisfy my "need" .
I have a wonder lust for a Beech 18 also but I don't see that working out anytime soon.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
#53
Ha! a Beech 18. I always wanted some of those old cool class of birds, but I used to say
"Even if I got it for free, I'd have to sell it as soon as the tanks ran dry."

Lets see, 450 hp a side, probably about 22-23 gph per side.....at $5 or so per gallon,
that is only $230ish fuel flow costs alone. And a friend with one was just making it pay
hauling jumpers until he had a gear malfunction and had to belly it in. Minimal skin damage,
but got the three bladed props, even though he shut down and feathered each to minimize
damage, dead sticked it. Had to sell the bird once it was repaired and new props.

My father had a lot of time in them, actually SNBs, was a fighter pilot but used them for
transportation over the years as he needed to go to DC more often on business. Just
grab the SNB and a RON bag and head out. Had to emergency land one with the
cowls hammer fitted to the heads and leading edges hammered flat, windshield intact but
so shattered as to be impossible to see thru after running into CAVU hailstorm.

Champagne taste, beer budget is what my Mom always called it. :) Yeah, that.

So what is the real diff between M-11 and A5? I thought they were pretty much
identical? Or is it like the guy on the old site, forget who, that "a 1911 has to have
a horse on the side or it isn't a 1911" kinda thing? If it doesn't say Browning and wasn't
made in Liege, it won't scratch the itch?

Bill
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
#54
Based on minimal investigation of the M11 , form and function being the same but no or very little parts sharing . Probably more like an Ithica 37 and a BPS .
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
#56
I had a vision of liquid cooled maybe inverted V-8 through the Pratt & Whitney and Hamilton Standard nose case . Getting it down to probably about 30 gal/hr net cruise and 975 HP available for take off climb out with 800 or so available for continuous duty . Yeah $5/gallon , but an aluminum KB hemi would be right at home with 100 octane and 140-180 mph ram air for sea level power to 8,000 ft .
It's funny how I liked the D-18 but not the Lockeed Electra . I always liked the B25 and B17 over the B24 .... No reason just aesthetic taste and something about some line .
It's like the 1860 Colts beautiful fluid lines , they point like an extension and mitigate recoil in a very useful way even when scaled up to the Walker and Dragoons . But the 1858 Remington works better after a while the Remmy grows on you and you long for a 75' . The lines of the Colts still call to me but the cap jams ..........
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
#57
Ok If we are looking for images from the un Civil war:
Shorpy .com has many":
In 1861, A.M. Chandler enlisted in the Palo Alto Confederates, which became part of the 44th Mississippi Infantry Regiment. His mother, Louisa Gardner Chandler, sent Silas, one of her 36 slaves, with him. On Sept. 20, 1863, the 44th Mississippi was engaged in the Battle of Chickamauga, where Chandler was wounded in his leg. A battlefield surgeon decided to amputate but, according to the Chandler family, Silas accompanied him home to Mississippi where the limb was saved. His master's combat service ended as a result of the wound but Silas returned to the war in January 1864 when A.M.'s younger brother, Benjamin, enlisted in the 9th Mississippi Cavalry Regiment. (See also: A Slave's Service in the Confederate Army.
"Sergeant A.M. Chandler of the 44th Mississippi Infantry Regiment, Co. F., and Silas Chandler, family slave, with Bowie knives, revolvers, pepper-box, shotgun, and canteen." Handwritten label on back of frame: "Andrew Martin Chandler, born 1844, died 1920. Servant Silas Chandler. 44th Mississippi Regiment, Col. A.K. Blyth. Wounded in battle of Chickamauga."
SHORPY-00834u.jpg
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
#59
... William McKinley was at Antietam as a sergeant in the 23rd OhioI nfantry September 1862. "Antietam, Maryland. Confederate dead by a fence on the Hagerstown road." The first major battle of the Civil War on Union territory was fought 150 years ago this month. Wet plate glass negative.
SHORPY_01097a.jpg