Turning case necks

Brother_Love

Well-Known Member
#1
I want to get into this phase of brass preparation. I’ve looked at several products available and all of them have mixed reviews.

What do you use and are you happy with the results?

Thank you
 

Spindrift

Active Member
#4
I have the sinclair tool. It works as it is supposed to, but I must admit I can't see much difference in the targets (I have standard chambers only)
 

Rick

Moderator
Staff member
#6
I have the sinclair tool. It works as it is supposed to, but I must admit I can't see much difference in the targets (I have standard chambers only)
It "can" be an accuracy aid if used for a rifle capable of seeing the difference. In a bench rest gun it can "help" shrink groups but it's doubtful many off the shelf hunting rifles would know the difference. When I was competing I used it primarily as a confidence aid, nothing like going to the line in a championship match knowing you've done all you can. Confidence in your equipment is priceless.
 

CZ93X62

Redlands, Kalifornistan
#8
I have yet to use or buy an outside neck-turner for my Forster case trimmer. I DO have neck reamers in a few rifle calibers that I have used to relieve thickened case necks or (alternately) accommodate skinny chamber necks. 22-250 has been the worst offender in this regard, and the new barrel on the 788 has a minimum chamber--which aggravates things further.
 

Rick

Moderator
Staff member
#9
I've tried inside neck reaming many times, even have some custom diameter reamers from Forster. Every single time I tried groups opened up considerably. Just plain didn't work for me. I've had a couple of custom XP-100's with Shilen Match barrels/chambers were the chamber was to tight to chamber any factory brass with a bullet seated, they had to be neck turned. My 6br had to be turned to .0105" with a Sierra bullet to chamber. I've had great luck with outside turning the necks but inside reaming was always a disaster and I abandoned the practice many years ago.

The whole idea behind inside reaming is that a donut will form at the inside base of the neck from repeated firings. Seems I never did have a donut problem, just an inside reaming problem. If it works out for others that's great but not for me anymore thanks.
 

Hawk

Well-Known Member
#11
I'm having some problem with PPU brass neck down to 7.62 by 40. Ordered a Forster outside neck Turner. I've already got the Forster standard and long frame. Everything's supposed to be here January 3rd
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
#12
Forster bench system here too. I generally outside-turn rifle brass just to take off the high side of the neck and no more. Sometimes uniforming the necks improves groups slightly if everything else is right, but more often it just makes me feel better and doesn't add much time to the initial length-trim operation.

Just shaving some brass off the neck isn't going to magically improve groups, it's just another tool in the box.
 

Intheshop

Well-Known Member
#13
First thing up is a tube mic. It is entirely feasible that you can find,through measure,cases with very good thickness #'s without turning. Segregate these and see if they show a difference on paper? possibly before buying into turning tools.

I put the tube mic in a little DP vise..... then hold/present the case neck to the mic. This way you aren't fumbling with anything. Better than the DP vise,and what we use in the machine shop..... it lives in the top of the toolbox next to mill....

A Panavise,tilted just so,and always has a 0-1" mic in it. Just don't want to take it from there,so use the little vise in the loading room. You can "buy" mic stands but,what's the fun in that? In any case, get your measuring tools/technique squared away.Good luck with your project.
 

Charles Graff

Moderator Emeritus
#14
I have a Forester, but it sees only occasional use. My Krags do best with larger cast bullets, and I outside turn the necks to give me proper chamber neck clearance. It works just fine.
 

Will

Well-Known Member
#15
I personally have never bought a tool to turn necks but have threatened too several time.

Looks like I may have to if I end up buying a 6.5 Timberwolf barrel. It uses 6mm dasher brass as the parent case or you can use cheap lake city 308 chop it at the should and resize. Then the necks must be turned down to fit the chamber.
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
#16
If I have a rifle that shows it deserves it : I like to average out the case necks getting rid of high spots.
Some milsurps need a "too fat" bullet for caliber.... Then I turn to compensate for the fat bullet!
 

Will

Well-Known Member
#17
Most of my experience with shooting cast has called for the opposite problem. I’m always needing more thickness in the neck area.

Too bad you can’t by extra thick brass and turn it to your needs.
 

Will

Well-Known Member
#20
Yeah I read about the process you all went through to get thicker necks.

I haven’t needed it that bad yet. But some day I may give it a whirl.