10mm 1911

Mainiac

Member
Whats the most accurate cast bullet for a 1911 10mm?
Looking to buy one,if they ever become available.
Have an itch to try that ruger,,with bullbarrell.
 

david s

Active Member
I don't know if it's the most accurate cast bullet but I've been using the NOE 403-198-WFN mould in a Kimber Eclipse 10mm 1911 and a Glock 20 to good effect.
 

CZ93X62

Official forum enigma
The only bullet weights I have ever used in 10mm are 175-180 grains and 200 grains. With the 200 grainers, keep speeds at or under 1100 FPS--Norma level loads (200s at 1200-1225 FPS) were the loads that broke Colts at the slide stop apertures, and I don't run them in my Glocks either. My upper limit for 1911s and Glocks are the Win Silvertips, 175 grain bullet at 1225-1250 FPS.
 

CWLONGSHOT

Residing in New England
I have 7 10mm pistols and another on the way... A few are 1911's.

IMHO a person would have to go a long way to find a "better" all around mold then the LEE 401175. I prefer the conventional grease groove over the tumble lube.

I have molds from 145-220g some I like better, but looking at the bigger picture and choosing just one. That would be what I would have.

CW

508625DD-3842-4ED5-BF62-DEF2C2F07CA3.jpeg
 

Charles Graff

Moderator Emeritus
John Browning and the Mormon God decreed that a 1911 pistol was to be in 45 ACP. I agree although I am not a Mormon, but my Grandmother was.
 

CZ93X62

Official forum enigma
The Lee TC-form autopistol bullets are all excellent designs, and the 40/10 x 175 is SUPERB in both calibers. When you look at the cataloged ammunition for the 10mm Auto, most bullet weights run in the 175-180 grain realm and are sent forth somewhere between 1030 FPS and 1250 FPS, with a preponderance of loads in the 1125-1150 FPS bracket. My opinion--these adjustments downward in bullet weight and velocity were made to address both 1911 frame cracking and recoil dynamics that might be problematic for less-seasoned users. I think very highly of the old Norma load standard of "200 grains @ 1200 FPS", but such loads are not for everyone or for every pistol.
 

CWLONGSHOT

Residing in New England
I want a 1911 10mm,,but there isnt any to be had,,i wanted a 38 super last week,,aint none of them either.
Discouraging, no guns,no primers,,,getting tired of this crap,already
They are around, just need to be a lil
More diligent. My local shop had a used Ruger 10mm come in when I was there other day.

CW
 

Matt

Active Member
The Ruger 1911 10mm is a great choice in a 10mm pistol. Mine is very accurate and easy to shoot compared to my Glock 20. I’ve not found an inaccurate.40/10mm cast bullet. I have a couple of .38/40s and even my ancient Winchester 180 gr RNFP mold is accurate in the Ruger, though not in either .38/40. The previous recomendations Lee 175 TC are spot on. I favor the TL version because it’s so easy to cast and lube. The most accurate in my .38/40s too.

I’ve been working on maximum velocity with the Lyman 150 gr 401654 with Blue Dot. This makes a flat shooting, hard hitting load, with a satisfying magnum pistol “crack” muzzle blast.
The 10mm pistol is a lot of fun.

Browning would approve of the proliferation of his 1911 regardless of what it’s chambered in.
 

CWLONGSHOT

Residing in New England
I have been a huge fan of Blue Dot for my 10mm loads for a long time.
But I have been trying Power Pistol lately. (With cast) and have been very pleasantly surprised!! Excellent velocities and low pressures. I can easily achieve velocities proper for the 10mm with lower pressures.

CW
 

BBerguson

Official Pennsyltuckian
I have been a huge fan of Blue Dot for my 10mm loads for a long time.
But I have been trying Power Pistol lately. (With cast) and have been very pleasantly surprised!! Excellent velocities and low pressures. I can easily achieve velocities proper for the 10mm with lower pressures.

CW
I love Power Pistol in the 10mm and it’s also the best metering powder I think I’ve ever used. Perfect in the Dillon.
 

Michael

Active Member
This post was good timing. My G20 arrived, I already the above Lee Mold, that I am still yet to use which I bought for my G27 that is getting sold.
PP and BD, I happen to have some of both. Any experience with using Longshot in the 10?
 

Petrol & Powder

Well-Known Member
I must say that the truncated cone [TC] profile is generally a good all-around bullet design for auto pistols. And if we are talking cast bullets for auto pistols, the TC type gets even more praise. The design allows a good compromise between several key areas: The TC profile tends to function well in a lot of pistols. The TC profile tends to be an accurate bullet in a lot of pistols (likely due to long bearing surface of the main body of the bullet and a good center of gravity location within the bullet). The TC design retains a flat point, which aids in terminal performance. The design is a compromise, but it’s a very good compromise.

A SWC has a distinct, exposed, shoulder where the front driving band protrudes from the case. That shoulder cuts nice holes in target paper but sometimes causes feeding problems in some bullet/pistol combinations. A TC design will almost always feed & function in an auto pistol. If you have a pistol that’s just a little fussy with a SWC bullet profile, a TC design in the same weight is highly likely to function better and give the same accuracy.
 

Michael

Active Member
This going back a number of years, the USAF was exploring moving to a truncated cone design with the 45ACP in order improve terminal performance while maintaining the FMJ for military use. If memory serves me correctly it was what led to Hornady introducing their FMJ-FP designs in 230gr in 45 cal and 124gr in 9mm. Somewhere in a unpacked box, I hope, unless I tossed it, I have one of the old 1980-ish +/- Gun Digest publications on handguns that had a chapter discussing alternate projectile designs for handguns. It primarily focused on the French Arcane design, similar to Lyman' 358303 and 429303 molds, but referenced the USAF research. Maybe someone else may recall and/or have a copy of the book floating around or buried somewhere.
 

BBerguson

Official Pennsyltuckian
I must say that the truncated cone [TC] profile is generally a good all-around bullet design for auto pistols. And if we are talking cast bullets for auto pistols, the TC type gets even more praise. The design allows a good compromise between several key areas: The TC profile tends to function well in a lot of pistols. The TC profile tends to be an accurate bullet in a lot of pistols (likely due to long bearing surface of the main body of the bullet and a good center of gravity location within the bullet). The TC design retains a flat point, which aids in terminal performance. The design is a compromise, but it’s a very good compromise.

A SWC has a distinct, exposed, shoulder where the front driving band protrudes from the case. That shoulder cuts nice holes in target paper but sometimes causes feeding problems in some bullet/pistol combinations. A TC design will almost always feed & function in an auto pistol. If you have a pistol that’s just a little fussy with a SWC bullet profile, a TC design in the same weight is highly likely to function better and give the same accuracy.
I didn’t have a problem with round nose cast bullets in autos until I started powder coating them. PC adds just enough to them to cause fail to feeds or the need to seat them extra deep. The TC bullets in my 9’s, 40’s and 45’s all feed flawlessly after powder coat. Struggled with too many 45’s before I decided to dump the RN bullets back in the pot and recast them to TC’s.