Custom Mauser 7X57mm

Jeff H

NW Ohio
Todd, The 1891 Argentine and Belgium Mausers have a tiny little claw extractor like the SAKO bolt face. While they must have worked well with a clean rifle and ammo, they never used it again. There are still thousands of those little extractors floating around and are almost always available on eBay.

Over time, I've heard, read, got the impression that Paul Mauser became adamant that his rifle would do everything it needed to do - without "stalling in the intersection" or harming the user, so he wouldn't stop, even with so few years between variations as the design evolved.

The big, BIG thing on the seemed to be the way it handled escaping gas in the event of a case rupture, and I developed the impression too that brass might not have been quite what it is today in terms of quality. Maybe an incorrect assumption, but what formed in my mind over time.

Paul Mauser's motivation was as a result of losing an eye to escaping gas, if I remember reading correctly, but I don't know from which model or if it was even one of his creations. If anyone the least bit interested in Mausers doesn't have Ludwig Olsen's book on Mausers, it's a worthwhile investment. There is a lot of fascinating historic information in that book. Now, I'll have to dig it back out again. I haven't seen it in years, but it's a great book to have.

Nothing wrong with those pre-98s either - beauties in their own right, but the 98 has all the bells 'n' whistles.
 

Glaciers

Alaska Land of the Midnight Sun
Ben nobody is going to say a black rifle is beautiful. Period. They are tools. But the classic lines with a finely made and appointed stock, well apples and oranges. I admit to have a black rifle and they are fun to shoot. But they don’t make you smile in the same way..
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
I did omit my appreciation of the rifle . It is a beauty.

As for the extractor force I've vented primers in a 22-250 in a Mark X 98' due to heat pressure rise with factory Win ammo . It was repeated with a middle load of 3031 a week later and I know for a fact that the load wasn't over done ......

Had an 1891 Carcano junker that I assembled into a new mildcat . When it , due to my error , vented primers it also didn't require any special force for extraction . The Carcano is a petite LR built around a short action cartridge . For what it's worth it vents gas well out the right side and bottom. At the tender age 75 it was proofed and held .

Also just a truck gun tool .
 

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
I've had pierced primers in a 43 Winchester, #4 Rem Rolling Block, M16A1, I think a couple others. I never knew in any instance until I looked at the casing. The Win 43 was 5 or 6 rounds one after the other, no clue I had an issue until I picked up the brass.
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
In the 98 the primer dropped out free fall in the action . In the Carcano the primer completely disintegrated and left a .220 pocket in the RP brass .....I guess that's something that happens when you're getting close to max loads with 130 gr data for a 6.8SPCII and your bullet actually weighs 141 gr . I now weigh all new to me bullets and alloy changes . The 5% of advertised design weight idea I had went out the window with that RCBS mould .
 

todd

Active Member
Todd, The 1891 Argentine and Belgium Mausers have a tiny little claw extractor like the SAKO bolt face. While they must have worked well with a clean rifle and ammo, they never used it again. There are still thousands of those little extractors floating around and are almost always available on eBay.
View attachment 29511

i owned 3 of '91 argies, 2 of them i gave to my sons. the last one is in my safe. i have the ammo ( .314" 180gr SAECO FN GC and Unique) but not the time.


I view hunting rifles as single shots. Some just have spare ammo carriers, I think so the extra three cartridges I take out don't jingle in my pocket.

the most i load up with bolt is two cartridges, as a matter of fact, two is what i use in pumps and levers.


Over time, I've heard, read, got the impression that Paul Mauser became adamant that his rifle would do everything it needed to do - without "stalling in the intersection" or harming the user, so he wouldn't stop, even with so few years between variations as the design evolved.

The big, BIG thing on the seemed to be the way it handled escaping gas in the event of a case rupture, and I developed the impression too that brass might not have been quite what it is today in terms of quality. Maybe an incorrect assumption, but what formed in my mind over time.

Paul Mauser's motivation was as a result of losing an eye to escaping gas, if I remember reading correctly, but I don't know from which model or if it was even one of his creations. If anyone the least bit interested in Mausers doesn't have Ludwig Olsen's book on Mausers, it's a worthwhile investment. There is a lot of fascinating historic information in that book. Now, I'll have to dig it back out again. I haven't seen it in years, but it's a great book to have.

Nothing wrong with those pre-98s either - beauties in their own right, but the 98 has all the bells 'n' whistles.


i think (my head hurts....lol!!!!) it was in 1901 and Paul was experimenting with a self-loading rifle or a semi rifle when he lost a eye. i also "think" (oww!!!!!!!!) that is was from out of battery cartridge.

wasn't Paul Mauser responsible for the trigger/sear mechanism? it is a piece of artwork!!!! we think of the trigger/sear mechanism of being so simple "that a caveman can do it", but being the first to design it? genius!!!

i should dig out Olsen's book too. i haven't read for years.

the 91 Argentine Mauser (Ludwig Loewe) is a piece of artwork too!!!
 

fiver

Well-Known Member
you wanna/gonna look at it or use it?
i've never been really fond of the LEE MK anything, but i wouldn't hesitate to use one to return fire, or beat down an old lady at a 2-4-1 linotype sale.
 

Ian

Notorious member
I appreciate and hunt with them all...with cast bullets. The Swede has two whitetail and numerous blackbuck antelope to its credit. Nothing I have is as nice as several of Ben's fine custom rifles though. Sweet as the one that is the topic of this thread is, I actually like Ben's other 7x57 that he's posted pictures of before a little more (if that's possible!)

Resized_20170416_185936(0).jpg
100_4456.JPG
Swedish Mauser stock2.jpg
 

Ben

Moderator
Staff member
Now that is some VERY NICE checkering.
I like that checkering ! !

Ben
 
Last edited:

Ben

Moderator
Staff member
One of my favorite cast bullets in the 7X57mm is the SAECO 073.
When I close the bolt on a loaded round, the nose seems to be about the correct dia. for good engraving.

gnBwbvw.jpg


gdjux3g.jpg
 
Last edited:

todd

Active Member
i should get a couple of 98 Mauser single shot followers. i wonder if they have any of the 93-96 Mauser followers?
 

Ian

Notorious member
Check out Score Hi's website. One of their gunsmiths, Andy, is a friend of mine that I meet up with sometimes when passing through Albuquerque. I also much prefer their proprietary bedding compound over any other.
 

Petrol & Powder

Well-Known Member
If you use a single cartridge follower, the cartridge will typically be pushed in front of the bolt face. When the cartridge bottoms out in the chamber you will force the extractor to "snap over" the rim when the bolt closes on the cartridge.

The Mauser "98" non-rotating extractor has enough flex built in to allow that to happen but this sort of defeats the reason to have a non-rotating extractor. I understand the desire for single feeding when performing target work but the 2/10 of a second it takes to just push the round below the feed lips and into the magazine will save some force on that extractor and the cartridge rim.
I’ve always seen the single cartridge followers as a solution in search of a problem.