Finally...first attempt

Walks

Well-Known Member
Looking GOOD !!!

When I cast with a Ladle, I do "Pressure" casting, i.e. turn the mold sideways, put spout in to sprue hole, turn mold and ladle upright, holding together tightly, roll ladle off sprue plate, leaving generous puddle.
It's the way I DO IT. Do what ever works best for you.
You do whatever works best for you. You might want to consider emptying that pot after your next session and taking some steel wool to it and the casting ladle. Ya got a bit of rust.
 

Snakeoil

Well-Known Member
When I cast with a Ladle, I do "Pressure" casting, i.e. turn the mold sideways, put spout in to sprue hole, turn mold and ladle upright, holding together tightly, roll ladle off sprue plate, leaving generous puddle.
I had to hand cast my Paul Jones 540 Postell with a ladle. Used the same technique as you with the exception of the puddle. Once poured I kept the mold vertical with the ladle held tight until the sprue set. A small plug would pull out of the ladle spout when I removed it. Loved that bullet in my Shiloh. But learned to hate the recoil once gray hair set in.
 

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
Sometimes pressure casting works sometimes the mold hates it. All part of the game of figuring out what works
 
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Dusty Bannister

Active Member
I had a Saeco #221 (225-60 grain) bullet mold that demanded pressure feeding and would not release the sprue puddle when cut. After much frustration, I cut the cone of the plate a little deeper, and that took care of the parallel hole between the end of the cone and the bottom of the plate, It still required pressure feeding until I slightly enlarged the hole in the plate. It required a very little larger hole, and I was cautious because too large a hole would make the sprue almost as large as the base of the gas check bullet. After that, bottom pouring made life so much easier.

On the other hand, the Lee 22 Bator mold I have has such a large hole your cut will deform the gas check shank and make seating gas checks difficult if not impossible.
 

Fiddler

Member
I tend to be a bit safety conscious and looking at that pot sitting on 2 rods gives me concern. Any way to add a third?

For sprue cutting I've used short sections of handles ie rake, shovel. I've gone through several over the years. Now using a rawhide mallet.
 

Snakeoil

Well-Known Member
I tend to be a bit safety conscious and looking at that pot sitting on 2 rods gives me concern. Any way to add a third?

For sprue cutting I've used short sections of handles ie rake, shovel. I've gone through several over the years. Now using a rawhide mallet.
You made me to back and look. I must agree with your concern. I suggest Tom put something like a heavy screen (rabbit wire) or similar across the stove grill and under the pot. Might even consider rolling it around the grill bars to keep it in place. Molten lead has no conscience.
 

TomSp8

Member
Fiddler & Snakeoil: After looking back at that pic, I see exactly what you mean. I will definitely remedy that! Thanks so much for that advise. And thank you everyone else for all the suggestions and patient guidance to a new guy!
 

Rockydoc

Well-Known Member
They don't do surgery for DC, anymore. They inject a chemical into the afflicted fingers, two days before the orthopedic surgeon forcibly straightens them out. There is a risk of tearing the skin, involved. You wear a splint, for 24/7 for two weeks. After two weeks , splint only at night, when sleeping. PITA and it returns in a couple of years. I had it done once and in need of the procedure again. :headbang:
My wife had the surgery for dupytrens contracture several years back and the physical therapy following surgery was one of the most painful experiences she has ever had. All in all it was a success.
Her nephew has it in both hands and had the injections. NOT a success.

Just last week I had surgery for carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger syndrome (two fingers) on my right hand. So far so good. Still bandaged.
 

TomSp8

Member
20220604_113423.jpgWell, third outing. I think much better. I definately saw a difference with temperature of the mold (hotter is better!). Also saw some bullets coming out frosty due to (apparently) too hot of lead. Definately had swings of good and bad bullets while attempting to wing it with the lead temp. I saved two thermometers in my Amazon wish list, one dial type and one digital with a probe. Leaning towards the dial type. After checking diameters of a handful of the visible keepers, some are smaller than they should be. Im assuming lead temperature fluctuation? 20220604_113348.jpg
 

Rick

Moderator
Staff member
In your first picture your sprue plate is too cool and your not pouring a large enough puddle. Look at pouring the sprue as pouring heat not lead. You will never get good bases with a cool sprue plate, it sucks the heat out of the alloy and the base freezes before the mold is full. The rounded bases are a no no and can be detrimental to accuracy.
 

TomSp8

Member
That makes sense. It seemed like I had best results when slightly flooding the sprue plate. I guess that hot lead keeps it from cooling so quickly.
 

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
If you're ladle casting, pour a truly generous sprue puddle. I mean if it's running back into the pot, that's ok! Got to remember the sprue plate and mould represent 3 different pieces of metal, 2 of the same alloy and the other of another. The mould gets the hot lead alloy in it and it's gets lots more heat. The sprue plate may not get near the heat the mould does, so a great big sprue puddle is perfectly okay. Once the plate comes up to heat you'll see the difference in base quality and overall ease of getting better castings. This can vary, but IME if the sprue plate is up to heat the mould pretty much has to be up to heat too. But the mould can be nice and warm and the sprue plate still too cool to get nice fillout.