New toy - 1884 Trapdoor

oscarflytyer

Well-Known Member
Finally picked up a Trapdoor. 1884. Don't know much about them specifically. Always looked for a shooter, not a collector. Going to have someone look at it just because. Seller (other forum) said he has shot it a bit. Hopefully it all checks out and I can have some fun. Might even convince me to try some BP Cartridge loading and shooting. One interesting note on this one (history wise) is it is marked 21 twice (2 sizes of same block script) on the stock, and US 21 and 21 (21s also diff size of same script). It might possible indicate 21st Infantry. If so, would be an out West gun of C Co 21st Infantry. Have to do some research to see, but would add the extra cool factor for me besides just shooting it.

PS: this one is set for the spike bayonet - not present. And someone OBVIOUSLY had zero clue how to remove it. They used gawd knows WHAT set of pliers to try to pinch the two bayonet levers, resting the pliers on both sides of the bbl and maring it horrible. Also why it is a shooter!
 

StrawHat

Active Member
My go to Springfield Single Shot Rifle website.


Also, if looking for good tips on reloading blackpowder for it,


I have a Model 1866 and a Model 1873. Long ago I figured what worked for me for everyday reloads. But, for getting the most accuracy from either rifle, I load the largest diameter bullet I can fit in the case and still chamber in the rifle.

Kevin
 

Missionary

Well-Known Member
Our 1st Trapdoor, an 1873, has a very large chamber allowing us to seat a .464 cast. That is the one bullet that will shoot well with Smokeless at 1100 fps. It is an old NEI 500 grain RNPB. We cast it from range scrap.
But BP still gives us the best accuracy by at least 1/4- 1/2 " at 100 yards off cross sticks.
With a 400 grain Beageled to drop range scrap and be sized to .464 BP again is king. Goex 2F works well for us.
The 500 RN cast of pure roof flashing will expand with 2F if cast from a mold that drops at least .460.

There are other TD's that we have that have far tighter chambers but again we load the fattest soft cast bullet the fired brass will allow.
BP groups are always hard to beat. Great place to start also as you will quickly learn what that barrel will do.

Then there is paper patching if you cannot get a fat enough bullet for your chamber. Time consuming but will sure make that old TD a real joy to shoot.
We also use cross sticks for rifles when they get over caliber .30. No sore body parts or colorful patches in the skin. Plus you are practicing for real field use all the time.
 

glassparman

"OK, OK, I'm going as fast as I don't want to go!"
Great deal on the new Trap Door!

Mine is an 1884 and I ONLY shoot BP out of the old girl.

My personal opinion is to only shoot what a weapon was originally designed for, as much as possible. Besides, BPCR shooting is a hoot!!

Mike
 

smokeywolf

Well-Known Member
Yours has more of a story to tell. I do love holding the ones that have obviously seen travel and possibly action and imagining at what they might have been aimed and why their triggers might have been pulled.
 

oscarflytyer

Well-Known Member
Yours has more of a story to tell. I do love holding the ones that have obviously seen travel and possibly action and imagining at what they might have been aimed and why their triggers might have been pulled.

Must admit I do Love the silent story tellers! If ONLY they could talk...
 

RicinYakima

High Steppes of Eastern Washington
Oh yes!
Of all the Trapdoors I have had, I kept the one that won the National Match for me. It is an 1873, bought off an Indian Reservation, that was never modified or messed with, just at Springfield Armory made it. Yes, it looks like an "Indian" gun, laid in the bottom of the wagon for ten years and never cleaned. Barrel is good and stock fitting is perfect. Shooting to the original sights at BP velocities.