OMG I saw the light and it was a hot plate

Rick

Moderator
Staff member
@Cherokee @L Ross You guys kinda got me thinking, I am overthinking this.

There is one thought that just crossed me. Aluminum draws heat. It is used in electronics, as heat sink material. When I used to play with soldering a lot, way back when you could buy components and fix circuit boards, used aluminum heat sinks to keep the heat from burning out the new transistor, ect.
Why would not laying an aluminum mold directly on the coils be ok? It is a diffuser, so their should be no need for a diffuser. Maybe with steel but not aluminum.

Just checked my aluminum molds, not a circuit board or transistor in any of them. :headscratch:
 

Jeff H

NW Ohio
@Cherokee @L Ross You guys kinda got me thinking, I am overthinking this...........................
I believe that when any one of us try to articulate how we DO something, it starts to sound more complicated than it is - or SEEMS to be.

On the other hand, we tend to also undervalue just how complex something is once it begins to work for us or we've "mastered" it.

Tying your shoes IS COMPLICATED!

Oh, I get a lot of pushback and stupid looks when I say that in class. Then, I ask someone to explain tying your shoes using only common words - no pictures, no videos, no demos,.... Anyone who's ever started to describe it soon realizes that seemingly "simple" things are often really very complicated.

Complicated things are DIFFICULT to conceive of or do at first, but become EASIER as we start to understand them more.

We also often find (especialy old,... ummm, EXPERIENCED people) that many "new" things are just a collection of a bunch of things we already KNOW how to do, so it SEEMs simple. It's not. It's just EASIER.

But, yeah. If you just start using that thing, you'll fall right into YOUR way of using it effectively very quickly. Anything anyone has said here is "for reference only."
 

Jeff H

NW Ohio
@Cherokee @L Ross.........Aluminum draws heat...............
YES! As @462 and @RBHarter mention, it's stuff you already know - it makes sense.

"Aluminum draws heat" is how we might initiate the concept of "coefficients of thermal conductivity." Aluminum conducts heat very well and is why it is commonly used in cookware. Same reason it's used as a heat sink in electronics, as you've mentioned. You could achieve the same even heat distribution using a steel plate, it just takes it a little longer to heat up evenly than aluminum does - or longer to cool down too. I'm sure many of us have experienced that in large-cavity aluminum moulds which heat or cool more rapidly than ones with a lot more mass. Stuff you already know.

Not "simple," but not "difficult."

Seems like every day someone comes up with some "new" concept discovered by the current up-'n'-coming generation, only to reveal itself, once explored, as something the rest of humanity has been doing for centuries or millennia. Surely we've all been there for that one.
 

Jeff H

NW Ohio
Just checked my aluminum molds, not a circuit board or transistor in any of them. :headscratch:

Well, when that DOES happen, THAT'S where I'm drawing the line. And NO BLUETOOTH! Fast-forward to the future when one's watch alerts one to the fact that their mould is up to temp and ready to cast? I'm OK with those target cams though. THAT's a good and proper use of the technology we have.

I don't mind trying something new, but anything with a chip, transistor or "touch pad" in or on it assures a certain segment of technicians a busy future in keeping things working. Currently, I'm working toward NOT "working."
 

Mitty38

Shatterpated Constituent
Most of my moulds are aluminum.
So I think after hearing everyone out, I need not be concerned a great deal.
I will start out with what I have and work from there. Starting at 400 ish degrees (seems to be the general consensus). Referring to what I read here as any issues happen.
At least The hot plate as is will give me better little 22 caliber bullets from my mould sooner.
At least in theory, cause is not anything but theory till you have tried it yourself. Right?
 
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Joshua

Taco Aficionado/Salish Sea Pirate/Part-Time Dragon
I have no idea what the “Official Temperature” should be.

I plug in my pot, and my panini press at the same time. Molds go into the press, it requires no block of wood, no saw blade, no aluminum plate, and no coffee can. It heats top and bottom. It will not damage an aluminum mold.

When the pot is ready so are the molds.

As far as temp goes, all I know is that I’ve got it cranked to high, and I’m shooting for a well done panini, heavily toasted on the outside, with cheese leaking out. Not quite smoking. That’s the perfect mold temp.
 

Mitty38

Shatterpated Constituent
As far as temp goes, all I know is that I’ve got it cranked to high, and I’m shooting for a well done panini, heavily toasted on the outside, with cheese leaking out. Not quite smoking. That’s the perfect mold temp.
Haaa,TEh HEhE Ha Ha, Deep breath....
Thank You! Made my whole day.
If it works it works. Would give you a thumbs up but that emoji just will not work on this computer. :cool:
 
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RBHarter

West Central AR
There's also the right way , written way , wrong way , my way , and somewhere in there the way that works for you with all of the particulars picked out that ultimately become exactly what was described but your version of the process . I would site paper patch as an example of cut a trapezoid πd×2 by d+ length base to ogive , roll tight with long end down , fold 3/4 to one full dia over base , load and shoot . Size core to bore +.001, finish dia should be groove +.001 .

I mean that's all there really is to it right ? Until you introduce the discussion about paper , wet vs dry , smokeless vs BP , tail angles basic vs land angle , alloys , bhn , twist , powder selection and twist , fold , tuck or flush base .

So it goes , hot plate , thermal dispersion , thermal dynamics of mould mat'l , sandwich press ........er ...... panini press .
 

CWLONGSHOT

Residing in New England
I really don't see this much of a problem… Turn the hot plate on lowest setting, you've got a diffuser plate on it from your steel saw blade.
Heat the molds up and Start casting... if it's not quite warm enough, turn the plate up a little continue! If it's still not enough, turn it up a little more…
Continue… If it's too hot too fast… Turn it down!
It's a chunk of metal, you can't possibly tell me you've never casted until you got frosted bullets. That means you're too hot, but no harm done, just set the mold aside and let it cool off then start over. It's lead it's not rocket science. Dont make yourself crazy!
CW
 
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L Ross

Well-Known Member
I have no idea what the “Official Temperature” should be.

I plug in my pot, and my panini press at the same time. Molds go into the press, it requires no block of wood, no saw blade, no aluminum plate, and no coffee can. It heats top and bottom. It will not damage an aluminum mold.

When the pot is ready so are the molds.

As far as temp goes, all I know is that I’ve got it cranked to high, and I’m shooting for a well done panini, heavily toasted on the outside, with cheese leaking out. Not quite smoking. That’s the perfect mold temp.
I was in the break room of the Court House one day having lunch with a gaggle of females. Clerks, office workers from the County offices, a D.A. etc. One of the gals looked at my sandwich which was a panini from a sandwich shop nearby and asked, "Is that a pantini?" With a perfectly straight face I said, "No pantinis come from Victoria Secrets, paninis are a sandwich." The spraying coffee and unfeminine guffaws were hilarious.