so waht ya doin today?

Ian

Notorious member
I gotta go check out of the Holiday Inn Express here in a minute but...

FLORASTOR is an antibiotic-proof bacteria substitute tha you can take during a regimen to prevent nausea, help digestion and absorption of food, reduce gas, prevent yeast infections, etc. It works well for me. Very expensive but worth it. Do the yogurt/saurkraut/whatever after the antibiotics.

You won't get a caffeine withdrawal headache if you drink at least half as much as you did the day before and at least half as much tomorrow as you did today, and so on.
 

JWFilips

Well-Known Member
Powder Coated My NOE-30 cal; 165 Ranch Dogs this afternoon A little over 2 hundred plain base With Clear PC ...my favorite
The outside steps to the bilco doors is were I PC but today the temps were in the low 30's so it took more time to get to temps Finally had to close the steel doors to get the oven to reach the 400 degrees for PC coating. Not the best scenario for the fumes but I didn't go into the airlock until time was up and opened the doors while holding my breath! :rolleyes: !
Still need a bunch more of these for the summer shooting so I will have to cast a bunch more times as soon as I get good weather again!
Also, Opened the safe and decided to re-clean a few guns I haven't shot in a while and then coat with "Liquid Film" and the metal surfaces and bores after cleaning! Something to keep me busy while I wait for the PC batches to be done! Now I have to do final re-sizing and final weighing...then Store!
Tonight I'm going to cook up a large home made Polish Kielbasi Way too much for one meal but I will freeze what is left in Serving portions.
Making up some mashed tatoes and broccoli also!
I guess the next Stom-a Geddon" comes tomorrow!
 

Snakeoil

Well-Known Member
Got a Redding Benchrest powder measure and stand from my shooting buddy Steve on Sunday. Like so many things on Steve's bench, he's not used them in a while, having replaced them with better stuff, like an Auto-Trickler. So, I brought it home, took it apart and cleaned it up. The anti-lash assembly was a surprise to me, never having worked on one of these before. Took a minute or two to figure out what it did and then how to reassemble. Pretty easy actually.

The micrometer adjustment is truly machine shop accurate for what you are doing. But, and this is a big but, I only have the rifle insert for the drum. I did not measure it, but it is close to 3/4" in diameter and that is a large surface area to be measuring tenths of a grain. Couple that with the relatively coarse thread, which looks like it is about a 24 TPI and you have a very hard time adjusting 0.1 gr out or into a load. What was very nice was I had tried it out dropping 17 gr of 2400 and I simply dialed in 15.5 from 17 using the micrometer and first drop was 15.4. That's impressive.

Steve said he has another that he was going to give me for parts. If I'm lucky, it will have the pistol insert which I expect will be a much smaller diameter piston making small adjustments to the load much easier. If not, then I might machine a new adapter and use the same thread pitch so I can use the micrometer from the rifle adapter. According to the Redding description for the measure, one comes with only the rifle adapter and another model comes with both. The pistol could be sitting somewhere on Steve's bench if there is not one in the other measure he said I could have for parts.

With the rifle adapter, I found that the load varied +/- 0.1 gr. I ended up measuring each charge for 20 round since I'm doing some more testing tomorrow.

I also need to revisit my RCBS Uniflow. I was looking at the new ones and they are different. Seems they changed the method of adjustment, making it more micrometer-like. I wish I had the ability to engrave numbers. Making a micrometer adusting drum for the Uniflow would be a pretty easy. But I could not bring my self to hand engrave with a vibro-engraver, the numbers. I can cut the lines on my mill with my dividing head. Maybe if I did the OD machining first, cut all the lines on the drum first, I could then stamp the numbers and once that is done, machine out the inside. Hmmmm... we'll see.
 

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
Outside of taking care of the dogs and some laundry, a big day of nothing. I think cutting the coffee helped. Horrible thing to have to do, but thems the breaks. Maybe tomorrow will be better.

Oh! I did manage to transfer what music I had on my old laptop to my new phone and then to my new laptop. It took forever and I'm sure there is an easier way, but at least I got it done. The new phone insists I use You Tube music for my music. Well, no! So it's saved back in the files where it's a pain to get to. There's probably a good program out there for geezers that want to listen to Sam Cooke and Hank Snow, but I don't know which one it is.
 
Last edited:

Snakeoil

Well-Known Member
I think cutting the coffee helped. Horrible thing to have to do, but thems the breaks. Maybe tomorrow will be better.
Worked with a guy many years ago. Really smart guy. Ran the controls lab for GE Power Systems. He was telling me that he used to drink probably 2 pots of coffee a day. When he had is annual physical the doctor looked at his bloodwork and said "What are you doing wrong?". Guy was kinda baffled by that question because he was a pretty quiet guy and not a partier by any stretch. After a bunch of back and forth questions the doc finally asked how much coffee he drank and he told him. Doc asked if he ever thought about how much caffeine he was putting into his system. Doc told him to quit and come back in some timeframe for more bloodwork. They guy did and when he went back everything that was out of whack returned back to normal. He became a one cup per day guy after that and said he felt better, too.

Jobsite trailers are notorious for making your drink infinite cups of coffee during the day. Offices are not much better. There is always a pot going and it's a good excuse to either come in from the job for a break or get out of your office for a bit. But my chiropractor told me that coffee tends to put your system into a fight or flight setting. It's like artificial stress. That and the story about the guy in the lab was enough for me. I drink one cup of homemade espresso every morning with my breakfast and that is usually it. I may have another cup at the club or stop at Stewart's for a cup to drink at Charlie's on Wednesdays. Don't miss it. Would miss that cup in the morning though. And it's not the caffeine. I can drink coffee before I go to bed and sleep fine. Wife on the other hand cannot drink coffee after noon or she'll be up all night.
 

Snakeoil

Well-Known Member
RCBS micrometer conversion, only works with the large drum on the Uniflow. At least that's the way mine does. Purchased it 20-25 years ago.
Just went on their website. No accessory micrometer drum for the Uniflow. I got mine from my wife's cousin when he passed. Have no idea how long ago he bought it. I would think at least 20 years ago and probably more like 30. Different arrangement than the current model. On mine the threaded piston screws into a bushing that screws into the drum. You adjust by turning the threaded stem on the piston. Stem has a knurled lockring to hold the setting. My guess is the micrometer barrel is an assembly that screws into the same 7/16" thread in the drum that the bushing screws into. The new drum is also drilled and tapped on the side for a locking screw. I'd have to go back and look. But I think the stem on mine has a flat that is graduated. So, knowing the pitch I can make a few measurements for one full turn. Knowing that, I can calibrate the drum markings to give me tenths of a grain. The RCBS stem is a much finer thread than the Redding. It looks like the micrometer barrel is fixed in place and when you turn it, it moves the piston stem in and out of the drum. I prefer mine design and I'll make the micrometer barrel to move with the stem and read on a fixed barrel that will be part of what screws into the drum.

Not sure why I'm getting all wrapped around this. The Uniflow served me well. The Redding added a bit more precision which is kinda nice to have. No reason the Uniflow cannot provide the same or even better precision.

Oh, and the current uniflow only needs on drum.
 
Last edited:

fiver

Well-Known Member
thank's Smokey.
but that is not how the Japanese guy in the mini van pronounced it.
it was more like jebus crist does it even F$%^&'n stop snorwing here.
not positive on the pronouncement it was hard to hear over the whirring noise his tires were making.


well the light thing down in the basement isn't gonna work.
i think i might end up swapping out the 3 foot led's i got the other day down there, and buying a couple of the 4 footers i can get here in town for the shop.
i got the light socket swapped out to take a plug in so it shouldn't take too long.
 

CWLONGSHOT

Well-Known Member
Buddy came over I assembled his new "toy". Then I installed new lights in shop and drill press room. MUCH better!!

Didnt make it back ta HF yet maybe tomorrow. I want a 1x30 belt sander and a stool.

CW
 

Snakeoil

Well-Known Member
Buddy came over I assembled his new "toy". Then I installed new lights in shop and drill press room. MUCH better!!

Didnt make it back ta HF yet maybe tomorrow. I want a 1x30 belt sander and a stool.

CW
Don't by HF belt sander. JUNK. Ryobi is not bad for the money. I have one. I use it a lot. Another option is check ads for a used industrial one.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Ian

CWLONGSHOT

Well-Known Member
Don't by HF belt sander. JUNK. Ryobi is not bad for the money. I have one. I use it a lot. Another option is check ads for a used industrial one.
I have been checking and the HF has very favorable reviews! Hundreds actually! I posted on a knife area of a popular forum single complaint was no variable dpeed. Yes there was better but not with out doubling plus on Costs.

I have looked at other brands.
 

RBHarter

West Central AR
Today wasn't a complete loss . I mucked about man cave a little and found the bucket of Berdan primed spent 303s . I'd annealed the necks but not gone any further towards making 410s out of them . So I ran them in a 45 Colts die with a 30 Carb decap and expander in it (don't ask why the RCBS expander was in a Lyman it's just better that way) , it opens the necks to about 43 cal . Then I was able to use an expander that reaches about 1.25" down inside the case and open it up . I started with 67 cases and finished with 59 . Splits and neck accordioning cost me 8 cases that are all cylinder length in the BH and just a titch long for the 1917 . If I trim those even at 1.850 they will make handy shot shells and be almost straight with a little neck turning.

Unfortunately these have the larger .220ish primers so I'll have to do the 209 drill deal on them vs the stake and swage LP/RP deal . This would be the opportunity to use up those #57 RP if they were still around but I didn't find any of them .
 

462

California's Central Coast Amid The Insanity
Placed a Thunder Mountain order for an originally designed recoil spring guide rod and plug, to replace the Randall's one-piece setup, and added an extractor.

The one-piece versus two-piece debate will continue to live on, but even if one setup is, indeed, advantageous over the other, I seriously doubt I'll ever be able to tell which one it is that holds the advantage.

No doubt, though, that after 27 years of outstanding service -- at least till I forced it to do a task it wasn't designed to do -- the Brownells bushing wrench has more than earned a nice comfortable retirement.
 

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
Today wasn't a complete loss . I mucked about man cave a little and found the bucket of Berdan primed spent 303s . I'd annealed the necks but not gone any further towards making 410s out of them . So I ran them in a 45 Colts die with a 30 Carb decap and expander in it (don't ask why the RCBS expander was in a Lyman it's just better that way) , it opens the necks to about 43 cal . Then I was able to use an expander that reaches about 1.25" down inside the case and open it up . I started with 67 cases and finished with 59 . Splits and neck accordioning cost me 8 cases that are all cylinder length in the BH and just a titch long for the 1917 . If I trim those even at 1.850 they will make handy shot shells and be almost straight with a little neck turning.

Unfortunately these have the larger .220ish primers so I'll have to do the 209 drill deal on them vs the stake and swage LP/RP deal . This would be the opportunity to use up those #57 RP if they were still around but I didn't find any of them .
I did that Berdan conversion on some 8x56R brass years back. Mine came out so that if I took a piece of paper and held it over the primer pocket and then seated the primer everything was snug as a bug in a rug. Never had any ignition issues whatsoever. A real pain, but I got by with it. Probably if I'd used a proper sized reamer or milling cutter instead of a drill it would have worked better.
 

Bret4207

Northern NY Dangerous extremist...???
Going to take a stab at getting something done again today. I know I have to go to town at some point. Probably have to get some round bales out too. There's wood enough in the basement, but a little more wouldn't hurt.

Hope springs eternal and all that...

I remember 25 years back reading other forums and old guys were always griping about health issues, couldn't understand it. No I are one!!!! ;)
 
Last edited: