Very interesting.....

Rick

Moderator
Staff member
#21
Scared him? More likely is that he realized he didn't find the sucker he was looking for. :rolleyes: He will find one though, some people will do anything to get their 5 minutes in the sun.
 

JonB

Well-Known Member
#23
Nov 11th 2016, the NYT put out a letter to it's readers, that they were "rededicating" themselves to honesty.
This isn't the first time they have done that.
Glen, if you were asking my advice, I would say PLEASE DO NOT talk to them.

PS, due to the "NO politics" on this forum, I will say no more.
 

Dale53

Active Member
#24
This is not a new thing with reporters. Many years ago, when I was touring on bicycles in the hills of Southern Indiana with my two young sons, we camped at a State Park just outside Columbus, Indiana. We biked into Columbus which, at the time, was a rather popular tourist town. One of the attractions was the childhood home of John Dillinger that had been moved there and turned into a criminal history museum about his life. It was quite interesting and pretty much told the REAL story about the sordid life Dillinger led. The newspapers of the time (including the nationals) had glorified Dillinger. In fact, one of the National Newspapers on display, had Dillinger being "murdered" (not the exact words but definitely the meaning) by J. Edgar and his agents even tho' Dillinger had a gun in his hand when shot.

I spent nearly thirty years as a major case Insurance claims rep, and was in every kind of household there is - from the homes of rapists, bank robbers, to CEO's of major corporations. That brought me in contact with several different reporters over the years. There were few I would allow in my home. Some were just absolutely bottom feeders. I know for a fact, that they not only distorted the truth, they just flat made up stuff. Some times I think they really believed their fantasies but mostly anything that would get them attention.

On top of that, if you read the local newspapers, you will also see that many of them can't even construct a sentence properly and that is their JOB.

Rant over - but as you can see, as a profession, they do NOT rank high in my estimation...

FWIW
Dale53
 

462

Active Member
#27
I've never been interviewed by a reporter, but my sister was regarding a lawsuit she and her neighbors had filed against the city. The story that subsequently appeared in the local fish wrapper was told almost exclusively from the city's side, with little mention of the homeowners reasons for the lawsuit, and it contained no quotes from my sister though she was the only homeowner interviewed.
 

fiver

Well-Known Member
#29
I heard that song so much when it come out I thought I was gonna throw up from hearing it.
it however did leave me with a lasting viewpoint of the press in my teens , and now I actually appreciate the music and words of the song.
 

Pistolero

Well-Known Member
#30
I have been interviewed twice for local news, both aircraft related. In one case several
things which appeared in the article between quotation marks were not something that was
true, or that I would have ever said, or that I said to this reporter. Basically, entirely fabricated
quotations.

Never trusted the media after that, and it was a generally favorable article about building your
own aircraft.

I have heard a term- enemedia, that sounds about right.

Bill
 

Dale53

Active Member
#31
I would like to add an addendum to my post above. My first job was carrying papers for the local (and I mean LOCAL, as in located here, owned by a resident, hired local people, and did an EXCELLENT job). It was a first rate paper. The reporters lived in our town of approximately 70,000, rubbed elbows with their neighbors, and were generally respected. A school mate of mine (we graduated the same year from the same high school) was the school newspaper editor and later became Editor of the Newspaper). He was a highly respected local Historian, that wrote several books on this area, preserving our local history. After the passing of the Founder of the newspaper, the paper was sold, the Editor was fur-lowed and the path was all downhill after that. By the way, the Founder lost a son to the War and gave the local YMCA a camp dedicated to his son. I attended the camp several times as a youngster. It was, and is, a wonderful place. Outdoors, along the Great Miami River and it offered canoeing, and wonder of wonders, small bore rifle markmanship. Speaking of the newspaper, I knew a number of people who worked there, including relatives, and you could use the paper in an English course as "how to do it". They had a team of proof readers, and it would be RARE to find a mistake in the newspaper. Now, the rag owned by out of towners, NO city presence AT ALL, no proof readers, nothing done locally, and you practically have to be a cryptographer to read it. Errror, after error.

That's it, rant over, but I did want to give credit to the fellows and gals in the past who did such a great job.

FWIW
Dale53
 
#32
While working as a detective I was often quoted as saying things …….without ever being interviewed. Rarely were the things cited something I would have said if they did interview me. Most of it was laziness on the part of the reporters rather than an intent to mislead. I don't trust any of them.
 
#34
"Dunno when or where that was Rick but today I would say much more than laziness it IS an attempt to deceive"

You will get no argument from me. Most of mine had no "political" content to be taken advantage of.
 

JonB

Well-Known Member
#35
Over a week has gone by, and I haven't heard a peep out of that NYT reporter. My questions must have scared him off....
Scared him? More likely is that he realized he didn't find the sucker he was looking for. :rolleyes: He will find one though, some people will do anything to get their 5 minutes in the sun.
well it looks like they found bullet casters for their article and they also found a slow news day to print it.
...
...
Inside the World of D.I.Y. Ammunition
Millions of weapons aficionados reload their own ammunition and cast their own bullets, acts of individualism that are hallmarks of the broader American gun ethos.

By Ian Urbina
  • Oct. 5, 2018
WRIGHTSVILLE, Pa. — Standing inside his cluttered garage workshop, Michael Crumling, a 29-year-old gunsmith, proudly showed off an impressive collection of lead bullets he has meticulously crafted from scratch.
Across the country, millions of weapons aficionados like Mr. Crumling reload their own ammunition and cast their own bullets — time-consuming hobbies that have been a part of firearms culture for generations.
But Mr. Crumling has also created something else in his garage that distinguishes him from his peers, a potential solution to a problem that has long vexed creators of 3-D printed guns: a bullet that wouldn’t ruin the plastic firearms.

read more at link:
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/05/us/3d-printed-guns-homemade-ammunition.html
 

Ian

Well-Known Member
#36
What a stupid ass. Too bad the .gov doesn't regulate the media so don't have to pass a 6th-grade graduation test to be a reporter and get a permit to print an article.
 

Rick

Moderator
Staff member
#37
Couldn't be any doubt somebody would want their 5 minutes in the sun.

Considering it's the NY Times it could have been far worse though I can't see any reason or purpose to combine plastic printed guns and bullet casting other than of course both are evil. Also had to throw in the hogwash about millions of tons of wheel weights along the roads. If those figures were remotely correct getting lead would be the simplest thing in the world. All you would need is a coal shovel and drums to fill up along any road of your choosing.

Now that the Times printed the article the rest of the media will no doubt follow suit. Monkey see monkey do. So who's ready to start defending - Your "need" to make your own?

Haven't heard the last of this guaranteed.
 

Maven

Active Member
#38
That article ran in the Oct. 7th NYT and was linked to the CBA website the other day, mostly because the CBA president and membership director (not the same person) were interviewed for and mentioned in it. To date, there have been no letters to the editor in the NYT and no comments about it on the CBA Forum.
 

RBHarter

Well-Known Member
#39
They did a pretty good job of making the law abiding look bad and a masterful job linking people who roll their own and do home gunsmithing to child molesters which seem to be gaining ground as socially acceptable ........
I'm confused are we good guys or bad guys ?????