9.3x57

RBHarter

West Central AR
I once dreamed of a 9×57 with a double set trigger but when the time came and the stars aligned ........

Now I have a real Gew 98 with a Jeager trigger and a ream away from 280 Rem and a Santa Barbra 98 in 358 Win with a light crisp 2 stage GI . The bottom metal is a really nice inside the bow release ........ The 280 is in a stock that feels good but aesthetically is something of a mud fence . The 358 is too long but the MV and targets say it's perfect , the stock is quite dated and a little long but it looks good . The floor plate drops out when I hit that load point whether it's my finger or recoil acceleration I can't say .


I guess what I'm saying is that you may have paid to much for "the one" but all isn't lost . The smith gave you the worst case firewood stock , rookie error trigger damage , bid . I've looked at a couple of double set triggers . Their simple machines , wedge's and levers with a spring or 2 . (It's been a while and they were TC) unless something was cut deep and or completely out of geometry it's not a loss just a putzing around , the solution came in a dream project . The too thin stock is a challenge but wrist breaks are repaired every day and modern polymer/reenforced epoxy/bedding products are amazing stuff .

You want to know what really kicked me in the gut ? The SB 98 came with the 700 styled bolt shroud and the Fajin stock is inleted for the 700 side safety . The triggers , even the cheap ones , with the top safety were almost $300 so I swapped the bolt for the GI shroud and safety .......weeks later , like 21 days , massive price drop and I would have spent , at that moment , $90 like spitting out a cough goober . But I didn't have the bolt , the barrel was headspaced for the GI , the 5th coat of tung was on the stock , all the time was already spent on the trigger and sear . I have a 50% early 70s walnut 98 Sporter stock . I don't have the just skill set but one of these days I'll sit down with the with the Gew 98 1916 DWM and lay out the beaver tail bench fore end and cut some rosewood caps .........or I'll bugger it up completely .
 

todd

Active Member
nowadays, because of my stroke(right arm/leg disabled), i lack the metal skills to install a double trigger. but i like'em!!!!!!
 

L Ross

Well-Known Member
The 9.3x57 shieked up a bit. We are sick, my shoot got cancelled and this lovely Mauser is across the State at my Smith's.
 

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todd

Active Member
i got 9.3x57 back from my gunsmith on tuesday. being one hand, cock on close just ain't fer me. now its a cock on open. he ordered a dayton cocking piece and striker spring and put them on. but he had a problem. he has done many dayton's pieces, but not the husky m46. to make a long story short, he had to cut about 1/4" off the firing pin.
 

Bisley

Active Member
So here's my situation with regard to the 9.3x57 as per the discussion:
In the mid 1980s, Dad bought a $125.00 (including shipping to Alaska, as I recall) '98 Mouser, all matching, in 8mm. We cleaned it with diesel oil (not gasoline) to remove the packing grease which filled the barrel and action, very effectively preserving the fine metal, I might add. Then we noticed something. From the breach, the barrel looked clean and smooth. From the muzzle, it looked rough. We determined the roughness at the end of the barrel consisted of chatter marks -- a sign of poor tooling, it seemed. I'm not a gunsmith.

The rifle has sat unfired for almost 35 years. Would I be money ahead to trade it in its current condition for a 9.3x57, or should I have it rebored/rebarrelled? I have plenty of time to consider this.
 

L Ross

Well-Known Member
So here's my situation with regard to the 9.3x57 as per the discussion:
In the mid 1980s, Dad bought a $125.00 (including shipping to Alaska, as I recall) '98 Mouser, all matching, in 8mm. We cleaned it with diesel oil (not gasoline) to remove the packing grease which filled the barrel and action, very effectively preserving the fine metal, I might add. Then we noticed something. From the breach, the barrel looked clean and smooth. From the muzzle, it looked rough. We determined the roughness at the end of the barrel consisted of chatter marks -- a sign of poor tooling, it seemed. I'm not a gunsmith.

The rifle has sat unfired for almost 35 years. Would I be money ahead to trade it in its current condition for a 9.3x57, or should I have it rebored/rebarrelled? I have plenty of time to consider this.
A. How does shoot or is it still unfired since you got it? B. Is it in full military configuration yet?

Myself, I'd shoot it and if indeed it shoots poorly I'd take advantage of the renewed collectability in Mil-Surps, flip it into something you'd like better.
 

Bisley

Active Member
A. How does shoot or is it still unfired since you got it? B. Is it in full military configuration yet?

Myself, I'd shoot it and if indeed it shoots poorly I'd take advantage of the renewed collectability in Mil-Surps, flip it into something you'd like better.
I fired it with mil-surp ammo they year we got it. It fit, fed, fired and functioned perfectly, and was accurate enough to hit 100-yard targets with the military issue sights. It remains in military configuration, as purchased. No aftermarket or reproduction parts.

If I do keep it, I would probably try paper-patching to load for it, owing to the rough barrel at the muzzle. At present, I have no ammunition, molds or dies for it.